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slobber2

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Reply with quote  #51 
Yes Anna And Jan ,:>)
Great threads and  great answers thank you :>)i know it helped me see the light ,and understand it more .
thanks again
Marge

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Reply with quote  #52 
Thank You Jan and Anna May for taking the time to answer some of our questions!
This is something I dont want to see put of the back burner again. WE need to test and start trying to be more aware so we can stop producing it. It has spread to the point now it is popping up in almost every line. Many still are not testing for cystinuria and no one should be breeding to dogs that are not tested. Make it a requirement. Its the only way we have to start protecting our dogs.

WE need as many answers as we can get to stop rumors of how the disease works.

Thanks again for your time. Its important that we all understand what is going on.

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Reply with quote  #53 

TYPES OF CANINE RENAL DISEASE IDENTIFIED IN THE BULLMASTIFF

Cystinuria

Cystinuria is an inherited disease characterized by an inability to reabsorb the amino acid cystine in the kidney tubules, resulting in an excess of cystine in the urine. Cystine is insoluble in neutral or acidic urine, so the formation of cystine crystals or, possibly, cystine uroliths (stones or calculi) in the kidneys, bladder, or urethra can result.

Because of the physiology of the male, irritation and blockage by calculi is much more common than in the female. ( Oifer's note*... this would imply that females can be affected and have similar symptoms as in the male, although less frequent) Afflicted animals may present with recurrent urinary tract inflammations; they may experience difficulty in urination or pass blood-tinged urine. Males may become completely blocked and can face kidney failure, bladder rupture and death, while cystinuric bitches may remain asymptomatic.

Use of a specific urinary screening method, the nitroprusside spot test, will give a reliable diagnosis; examination of the urine for cystine crystals is not a reliable indicator since these crystals are not always present in the urine. Surgical removal of stones may be indicated. Special diets and medications may be helpful, but their efficacy has not yet been documented. There are two common drugs of choice that bind cystine and prevent crystal formation and, in some cases, they have been found to dissolve small stones, but not all dogs respond well to this treatment.

In Newfoundlands, cystinuria is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In simple terms, this means that affected dogs of both sexes have two mutant (diseased) genes. Their parents are either "carriers" (asymptomatic but carrying both a normal and a mutant gene) or are also affected (with two mutant genes). Due to the efforts of Newfoundland fanciers and Dr. Paula Henthorn at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, there is now a DNA test available which can determine the genetic status of individual Newfoundlands before breeding.

The disease has also been identified in Mastiffs and Bullmastiffs, though there is not yet confirmation of the autosomal recessives mode of inheritance in these breeds. At present, there exists no specific screening process for Bullmastiffs. 


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Reply with quote  #54 

 

 


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Reply with quote  #55 
Came across this research recently about MSM..a commonly used supplement  in our breed along with Glucosamine and Chondroitin. 
MSM is a sulphur and could quite possibly affect the nitroprusside test..giving a false positive..as other sulphur drugs have been shown to do.
whole article;  http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/DSH/msm.html 

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) -- also known as methyl sulfone or dimethylsulfone (DMSO2) -- is an odorless breakdown product of dimethyl sulfoxide

In living organisms, sulfur is found mainly in organic molecules. Humans obtain it by absorbing the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine, cysteine, and cystine [8]. Thus it is automatically obtained by consuming adequate amounts of protein foods (meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk, cheese, nuts, and legumes) and requires no separate consideration.

Limited amounts are present in inorganic sulfates, sulfides, and thiamin; and sulfur is also a part of biotin and pantothenic acid. Although sulfur is considered to be an essential mineral, no dietary requirement for inorganic sulfur has been found and no Recommended Dietary Allowance or Estimated Safe and Adequate Daily Dietary Intake has been established for it. In fact, the 10th edition of Recommended Dietary Allowances does not discuss it.

The claim that MSM is an important source of dietary sulfur is unsupported by published research. One study that involved feeding MSM to guinea pigs found that the sulfur from MSM was absorbed rapidly into the blood stream and was incorporated into methionine and cysteine of serum proteins. However, most of the sulfur appeared in the urine; less than 1% was incorporated into serum proteins. Increasing the dosage of MSM 100-fold increased the incorporation into serum proteins only 3-fold, indicating that the capacity to use MSM in this pathway is limited [12]. Thus, while MSM is naturally present in small amounts in a variety of foods, its contribution to sulfur metabolism in humans is likely to be negligible.


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cariston

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Reply with quote  #56 
Maybe fundraisers should be held and rescue organizations should be asked to participate in testing ALL mastiff and mastiff mixes  in finding out exactly how much more of the mastiff community is affected aside from breeders dogs..


There may be alot more positive bitches than we actually know as well..

If we held more educational seminars for mastiffs., maybe we could raise more money there and donate to upenn and keep track of exactly how much is being donated so that we know we have pitched in as a whole community rather than counting on parent clubs or wealthy breeders.


Maybe post on the MCOA site that pet and show puppy buyers test their dogs annually and to encourage people to collect and send off the urine through their vets as to show " no funny buisness", and that your urine sample is legit.



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Reply with quote  #57 
Has anybody any news on this?

The last I saw was the video from this year's MCOA specialty.
Pretty non-committal
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Reply with quote  #58 
I watched the video of the 2010 MCOA Specialty Health Seminar and I also saw the seminar in person and I did not get "non-commital" from it, at least not from Dr. Henthorn.  The Mastiff Community may have been a little non-commital in the past with their lack of concern, lack of Cystinuria testing, and lack of research participation for the first 10+ years of the research, but things have changed quite a bit over the past "2 years"!

Although UPenn has been studying Cystinuria in Mastiffs & other breeds for over 10 years, the majority of the Mastiff Community as a whole really only became really active in this in 2008! 

In the first 10 years of research there were very few blood samples submitted to UPenn for the research and UPenn was mainly focusing on the two genes that cause Cystinuria in humans.  That is how they came up with DNA tests for Cystinuria in Newfoundlands, Labrador Retrievers, and now Australian Cattle Dogs.  Back then we also thought it might be X Linked, not realizing that the males CAN pass it to their sons.

In the past two years we've made a LOT of progress!:
  • The gene mapping technology (SNP Chips) has become very advanced and more readily available and is being used by UPenn for the Canine Cystinuria Research.
  • UPenn has received a lot more urine & blood samples and research participation from the Mastiff Community
  • More people are Cystinuria testing their Mastiffs
  • Better Computer Software Programs have been developed and are being used to analyze the data, etc...

In addition to the progress made in the past 2 years, this past year has been VERY PRODUCTIVE with the Cystinuria research at UPenn! 

Dr. Henthorn probably already has enough data collected to give us a DNA marker test for Cystinuria in Mastiffs, which can tell us if our dogs have one or two copies of suspicious chromosomal regions associated with Cystinuria & can pretty accurately predict which of our dogs are at the highest risk of forming cystine stones.  There are still a lot of unanswered questions, but we are super close to at least having a better tool to use for screening our dogs.

Since the National UPenn has found another marker, so there are at least 3 markers that are being closely analyzed! 

Dr. Henthorn is running more gene mapping and sequencing via more customized SNPs that specifically analyze these suspicious chromosomal regions and she will be using other gene mapping techniques and processes to find a marker that is even closer to the actual gene(s) mutation(s) that are responsible for Cystinuria in Mastiffs, but her goal is to find the ACTUAL GENE(s)!  She would prefer to offer us an actual DNA gene mutation test instead of a marker test!

She is also focusing on the roll testosterone might have on the expression of the disease in Mastiffs and possibly other breeds. 

I am looking forward to having a DNA test for Cystinuria in Mastiffs and....
I KNOW THAT DR. HENTHORN IS COMMITTED TO DOING THIS FOR US!

Anna May

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Reply with quote  #59 

Anna May - Thank you so mush for this update. What GREAT news!!


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Reply with quote  #60 
Fantastic news Anna!
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Reply with quote  #61 

Thanks for the latest update Anna! I watched the video from the specialty and I didn't see noncommittal. I saw real hope of finding markers. I saw that it is not sex linked recessive and that there were two area of real interest at that time. Glad to hear more new is there now! THANK GOODNESS!!


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Reply with quote  #62 
How many participants at the speciality provided samples as requested out of how many male dogs present?

What is the date the DNA test will be available?

Is the marker test available?

Non-comittal on "time-frames" and exactness was not expressed.
Though Dr Henthorn is firmly committed to answers she herself expressed there were some factors presenting themselves, such as the potential interaction of testoseron, that caused complications in an answer to a DNA test.

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Reply with quote  #63 

BTW Anna M - nice synopsis.

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Reply with quote  #64 
I would like to go on record here.  Due to a personal vendetta against my pedigree it has been intimated that my pedigree is tainted with cystinuria.  Not so, it is no more tainted than any other pedigree stated here.  I would appreciate it if those with interest in stamping out "C" would compare the number of "C" dogs in my pedigree as opposed to the other affected pedigrees and make the decision for yourself.

It truly is unfortunate that one disgruntled, bitter person can cause such havoc.  I have never shirked my responsibilities as a breeder.  I've never bred litter after litter, year after year.I have asked Marge to supply me with the dogs that have tested positive from my pedigree.  Only one dog so far has tested negative, that would be Neiko.  If there is more than one dog with our pedigree that has  tested positive Marge cannot supply me with the names and pedigrees.  If they are out there please forward them to me.

It is truly a shame that one person can take a minimal amount of knowledge publish it to a public forum as fact and be believed.  She libeled herself when she said Chewy tested positive.  There are a lot of pedigrees out there that carry Pallone, Erieside, Spring Hollow, and Titan lineage.  To put such a stigma on those breeders is unconscionable.

I think Marge Lutz should be censored.  I know she doesn't belong to the MCOA so that is an avenue not open to me.  I would like those involved in the mastiff world to read the pedigrees, check the registers and search for your own answers and not rely on Marge who's story changes with the weather.

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Reply with quote  #65 

In my last post I stated that "Only one dog so far has tested negative, that would be Neiko"  it should have read positive, I guess my mind was getting ahead of my fingers.

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Reply with quote  #66 
Personally I think it is very sad that some people enjoy finger pointing at other breeders and their dogs, etc...  As far as I'm concerned Cystinuria is all over the place and in many Mastiff pedigrees.  Some more than others and frankly, I don't know who has it or had it unless the owners have told me or published it publicly.  I do my best to NOT get involved with gossip from people talking about other peoples dogs. 

Yes, when looking at certain pedigrees from Cystinuric Mastiffs there often appear to be common dogs and bitches, but not always.  If the bitches in the pedigree were NP urine tested, they would have come back negative and often the common dogs are no longer around to NP urine test and they weren't tested when they were living or they were tested before adulthood, so we may never know if they had elevated cystine in their urine unless the owners choose to use stored DNA (OptiGen or CHIC) or frozen semen to test them when we get our Cystinuria DNA test.  Although I would be interested (curious) in knowing that information, I do NOT think it is necessary or important to test dogs from the past, but the importance will be to test our living dogs and bitches before they are bred and the males even if they are pets and not bred to know whether they are at risk of forming cystine stones or not when the Cystinuria DNA test becomes available in Mastiffs.

Whether a dog is cystinuric or not is only one small piece of the puzzle when selecting dogs for breeding.  First we should evaluate the dogs temperament and type and if those are worthy of reproducing, then we should look at the health status of the dog.  Obviously everyone will have their own opinions on what they can live with and cannot live with and some health issues are harder to treat or cause more harm than others. 

Bad elbows or hips can cause a lot of pain and discomfort even though Mastiffs are stoic and usually don't complain unless it becomes something they can no longer hide...  PRA and CMR (severe types such as detached retinas) can cause blindness, etc... 

We once thought Cystinuria although usually treatable was often a death sentence for a Mastiff because owners often could not afford the medication Thyola at around $500 a month or $6000 a year as that was just too much for some people and the surgery to reroute the urinary tract is also expensive, often requires the skill of veterinarian specialists and many consider the surgery very invasive with lots of swelling and blood...

Now when looking at the Cystinuric Mastiffs that have elevated cystine in their urine and form stones at a younger age they have two copies of a suspicious genetic marker (one from mom & one from dad).  The Cystinuric Mastiffs that have elevated cystine and COLA in their urine but do not form stones or form their stones at a much older age either only have one copy of that suspicious marker or they have two copies of the other marker.  Obviously UPenn does not have blood on every Cystinuric Mastiff, but this is what they have found in the dogs that they have blood and urine on.

The exciting news is that UPenn has observed that some Cystinuric Mastiffs no longer have elevated cystine in their urine several months after being neutered.  If they do not have elevated cystine in their urine they are no longer at risk of forming stones.  They can still pass the bad genes to their offspring if bred (i.e. frozen semen), but they themselves should not form cystine stones without elevated cystine in their urine.  I have heard that there are a couple Cystinuric Mastiffs that have continued to form cystine stones years after being neutered, but the last time I asked UPenn did NOT have any Mastiffs in this research project that they knew of that had elevated cystine in their urine or that had formed cystine stones several months or years after being neutered.  If you know of a dog that has, PLEASE send blood and urine and a copy of the stone analysis reports to Dr. Henthorn at UPenn ASAP.

Knowing that many Cystinuric Mastiffs live their entire lives without forming stones and that many neutered Mastiffs no longer have elevated cystine in their urine and don't form stones, we now understand that a Mastiff breeder or stud dog owner can breed multiple generations over many years and never know their dogs have Cystinuria or that they have produced dogs that have Cystinuria unless they do the NP urine tests on their dogs and their in tact male adult puppies (AT OR AFTER 24 months of age & then repeat the testing if negative, especially before breeding) or if one of their dogs or their offspring form cystine stones and the puppy buyers let the breeder and stud dog owner know about it.  The same is true with hips, elbows, eyes, hearts, etc... some affected dogs are symptom free and we don't know if they have problems unless we test for the problems or they show symptoms of the problems.

When the Cystinuria DNA Test becomes available for Mastiffs the goal will not be to eliminate dogs for breeding.  As mentioned above, there are many other factors to consider when determining which dogs should be bred and which dogs should not be bred and Cystinuria is only one piece of that decision.  The goal of having a Cystinuria DNA test for Mastiffs  will be to determine who we can safely breed our dogs and bitches to.  If the dog/bitch is genetically C+ or a carrier ideally we will breed to a C-dog/bitch if and only if the dogs/bitches are worthy of being bred in the first place. 

If the neutering theory pans out to be true then that will help us to avoid having C+ Mastiffs that block from cystine stones. 

Some people are mean and some are ignorant some are mean and ignorant.  Luckily there are many that are kind and care and will work together and learn from one another...  No person is perfect and no dogs are perfect.  Some are close to perfect though :-) 
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“Canine Cystinuria in Mastiffs”
Friday, May 13, 2011 12pm -3:00 pm

Location: TBA

Presented by Dr. Paula Henthorn, PhD

http://www.mcoa2011.com


The Mastiff Club of America Charitable Trust is offering this educational seminar and luncheon to everyone interested in attending. It will be presented by Dr. Paula Henthorn, PhD, Professor of Medical Genetics, with the Department of Clinical Studies and Chief, Section of Medical Genetics at the Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of Pennsylvania. 
 
Dr. Henthorn’s research interests and expertise includes characterization and therapy of canine and feline models of human genetic disease, with a focus on molecular genetics and gene mapping of complex inheritance. Her research has lead to several DNA based health tests in both dogs and cats and her current medical research goals continue to include the development of DNA-based tests that can be used to eliminate diseases from companion animals through selective breeding, and to develop and test therapeutic approaches for treatment of genetic diseases in both man and animals. Dr. Henthorn will be sharing updated information on Canine Cystinuria in Mastiffs! 

Registration:
Pre-registration is required for ALL participants. 

$25.00 fee for all attendees includes lunch. Pre-registration and payment is 
required.

For questions please contact:
Lora Myroup: SilverKnightMastiffs@gmail.com
Mary DeLisa: DivineMastiffs@gmail.com

Anna May:  mastiff@iinet.com

Payment Information:
$25 includes seminar and lunch
Payment may be made thru PayPal on the MCOA PayPal page.


To purchase with check or money order:
Please download and enclose the Health Seminar and Luncheon Form
All checks payable to MCOA Charitable Trust
Diane Lyons 

20 Milmohr Ct 
Northport, NY 11768

mastiff2011@yahoo.com



Heather 


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Reply with quote  #68 

Latest news!! Possible DNA test by late summer. Not going to be an absolute Yes or No test, but will tell us "if" our kids have the chance of having C+.


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Anyone,

Do we know how reliable the test will be ?
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CYSTINURIA UPDATE

 

Dr. Paula Henthorn and her colleagues have found a set of DNA Markers for at least one type of Cystinuria in Mastiffs that are found in two copies (one from mom & one from dad) in intact male boys that have formed stones between  1 1/2 years and 4 years of age and.......

 

when there is only one copy of the “bad” version of the markers, some of the intact boys have elevated cystine in the urine and some of those form stones (usually at an older age, but they have seen a range from 3 years to 9 years of age when the dog first forms stones), and yet other dogs with only one copy of the “bad” markers don’t have elevated cystine.

 

Dr. Henthorn said she is hoping to turn this finding into a DNA Marker test for Mastiffs in the next few months.

 

She also let us know that a number of Cystinuria positive boys that are neutered stop dumping excess cystine into their urine, so neutering appears to be a treatment for the disease, and should prevent stone formation. While Drs. Henthorn and Giger have seen this in a number of dogs (at least ten), please contact the researchers if you know of a Cystinuria positive dog that still tested positive more than a month after he was neutered. It is important to determine if neutering will lower the urine cystine levels for all dogs with elevated urine cystine. 

 

We will need to continue testing the urine of the intact boys (at least two tests at or after 24 months of age) that have no copies, or only one copy to help figure out the other form of Cystinuria (remember that there are some boys that do NOT have the bad marker but have elevated cystine in the urine).  While there have been NO reports of stones from the C+ boys that do not have the bad marker, the researchers do not have DNA from very many dogs that don’t carry the bad marker, so they need to keep looking.

 

Good News:  we'll have a genetic DNA marker test for both females and male Mastiffs that will predict which male puppies are at risk for early stone formation and which breeding pairs are at risk for producing these boys, AND neutering should help prevent the males from expressing the disease (in both the dogs that form stones early and those that form stones later).  In other words, the new DNA Marker test will help us identify the male Mastiffs that are at a high risk of forming stones and it will identify both the males and females that have the bad markers which will help us make our breeding decisions and eventually breed this problem out of our gene pool. Knowing that neutering has a good chance of curing the disease gives us many more options for managing this disease, both for individual dogs, and for our beloved breed.

 

Other News:  We will need to continue the research to fully understand it all...

 

We’ll send out more announcements to let everyone know when the Cystinuria DNA Marker Test is available for Mastiffs.

 

If you would like to participate in the ongoing Canine Cystinuria Research or offer your financial support to the MCOA Charitable Trust’s Health Programs, you can get more information and the Cystinuria Research DNA Consent Form on the MCOA Website at:

 

http://www.mastiff.org/CYSTINURIARESEARCH.htm

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NEUTERING CYSTINURIA POSITIVE DOGS IS BEING

INVESTIGATED AS A TREATMENT

 

In addition to collecting blood, urine and stone analysis reports from dogs that are Cystinuria positive, Dr. Paula Henthorn is also asking for blood and urine from dogs affected with Cystinuria that are going to be neutered.  Ideally she would like a sample of urine before the neuter surgery, one taken on the day of the neuter surgery and at least two urine samples (taken one week and two weeks) after the neuter surgery.  Each sample must be labeled with the date of collection and she'll also need to know the date of the neuter surgery.

 

Neutering may become the best treatment option for some breeds as PennVet has seen several dogs (including Mastiffs, and dogs of some other breeds) that had elevated cystine in their urine before being neutered and then the cystine levels went down to normal after the neuter. 

 

More than likely, neutering is only going to help the breeds where the males are the only ones that express symptoms of the disease (elevated cystine in urine and/or cystine crystals and/or stone formation) such as Mastiffs.

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Reply with quote  #72 

Bump, just because of the C+ scare I have been dealing with, even if it doesn't turn out to be Cystinuria, it's still scary as hell


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Reply with quote  #73 

Any update on the DNA test?


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Dr. Henthorn at UPenn let us know we can offer the Cystinuria DNA Marker Test at the 2012 MCOA National Specialty this year.  She has not told us how much the test will cost yet, but once she does it will be publicly announced.  She needs to work out a couple things before the test will be available to everyone and before she can give us the price of the test.

 

Dr. Henthorn is continuing her research to find the exact gene mutation that causes Cystinuria in Mastiffs and other breeds.  In doing this she needs to look at the DNA from other breeds to compare the Mastiff DNA to.  If you know anyone with a cystinuric dog of any breed other than New Foundland and Labrador Retriever, PLEASE ask them to donate blood and urine to Dr. Henthorn for the Canine Cystinuria Research.  The other breeds might hold the key to the missing puzzle piece to find the exact gene mutation in Mastiffs and the other breeds.

 

Anna

 

 

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Reply with quote  #75 
GREAT news!!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by annagmay

Dr. Henthorn at UPenn let us know we can offer the Cystinuria DNA Marker Test at the 2012 MCOA National Specialty this year.  She has not told us how much the test will cost yet, but once she does it will be publicly announced.  She needs to work out a couple things before the test will be available to everyone and before she can give us the price of the test.

 

Dr. Henthorn is continuing her research to find the exact gene mutation that causes Cystinuria in Mastiffs and other breeds.  In doing this she needs to look at the DNA from other breeds to compare the Mastiff DNA to.  If you know anyone with a cystinuric dog of any breed other than New Foundland and Labrador Retriever, PLEASE ask them to donate blood and urine to Dr. Henthorn for the Canine Cystinuria Research.  The other breeds might hold the key to the missing puzzle piece to find the exact gene mutation in Mastiffs and the other breeds.

 

Anna

 

 


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Reply with quote  #76 

Spectacular!


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That is AWESOME news!! Anna, do you know if they can use blood from dogs that we've already submitted for the research?


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Ideally they will want new blood samples if the dogs are still alive.  If we want to test dogs that have passed away they can use the blood they already have.  We should also be able to transfer DNA or use frozen semen on the dogs that have passed away if we want to have them tested and they were not part of the research.

 

They might let us submit buccal cheek swabs or saliva for the new Cystinuria DNA marker test, but that is still being tossed around.  I'll share the details once I know what they decide...

 

THANK YOU!!

 

 

Anna

 

 

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Reply with quote  #79 
Any more news on the test?  I am curious as to the price.

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Reply with quote  #80 
Bump ... looking for an update now that the specialty is in the rear view mirror.
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Reply with quote  #81 

Well? Do we have a marker yet or not???


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Reply with quote  #82 
Contact Anna May for the latest update and form to submit.

I'd tell you more but since I wasn't at the specialty I don't know any
more than that.

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Reply with quote  #83 
Has anyone that had their dog DNA tested at Specialty heard the results yet?  I'm getting ancy here!
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Reply with quote  #84 
The Cystinurina DNA Marker Test results take 6-8 weeks for results so I'm expecting that to be within the next week or two.

Anna
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Reply with quote  #85 
Should we be doing the urine test AND the blood test or just the blood test???
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We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
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Reply with quote  #86 
Also - can we use the cheek swabs? And how much $$?? Details here please!
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http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
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Reply with quote  #87 
Quote:
Originally Posted by annagmay
The Cystinurina DNA Marker Test results take 6-8 weeks for results so I'm expecting that to be within the next week or two.

Anna


Thanks Anna!

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Reply with quote  #88 
Blood is preferred but they'll accept cheek swabs.  
Still need to test urine on adult intact males.
I'll post the submission form with instructions tonight if it hasen't been posted by someone else.  It's also on a couple of the Facebook Mastiff groups.
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The best cystinuria treatment option for Mastiffs and some other breeds appears to be neutering. Neutering will not prevent the dogs from blocking that already have pre-existing cystine stones in their urinary tract, but neutering is making the urinary cystine levels return to normal levels on the genetically affected Mastiffs.

Below are the most recent forms as of today, March 9, 2013:

Cystinuria DNA Marker Test Submission Form
http://www.mastiff.org/images/CystSubmForm010413.pdf

Cystinuria DNA Marker Test Submission Form (Fillable)
http://www.mastiffs.org/files/CystSubmForm012913-fillable.pdf

Cystinuria DNA Marker Test Questions and Answers
http://www.mastiff.org/images/CystNonTypeIQA2013Jan04.pdf

Canine Cystinuria Research Consent Form
http://www.mastiff.org/images/2Cystinuria%20Research%20Consent%20Form%2010-20-2010.pdf

Cystinuria Nitroprusside Urine Test Submission Form
http://www.mastiff.org/images/Mastiff%20Cystinuria%20Urine%20Test%20Form%2012-4-09.pdf

Contacts:

Dr. Paula Henthorn, PhD
Cystinuria DNA Test and Research
Section of Medical Genetics
Phone: 245-898-8894
E-Mail: CystinuriaDNAtest@gmail.com

Dr. Giger, DVM, ACVIM, ECVIM
Cystinuria Nitroprusside Urine Testing
Metabolic Lab
Phone: 215-898-3375
E-Mail: PennGen@vet.upenn.edu


Dr. Henthorn is in the process of writing a manuscript for peer review on the Non-Type 1 Canine Cystinuria Test which will include information on the neutering observations. In the mean time the Mastiff Club of America consulted with a neutral third party expert, Dr. Jerold Bell, to review the science behind Dr. Henthorn's Cystinuria DNA Marker Test and he reported that the science is valid and the test can help Mastiffs. I am attaching a copy of Dr. Bell's Report.

 Bell Review of Henthorn Cystinuria Research - public 2-4-13.pdf

If you have a dog with cystinuria, please consider participating in Dr. Henthorn's ongoing canine cystinuria research. 

You may also be interested in joining the Canine Cystinuria Yahoo Group to discuss canine cystinuria with other owners of cystinuric dogs...

http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/CanineCystinuria/




Anna May

 
Attached Files
pdf Bell_Review_of_Henthorn_Cystinuria_Research_-_public_2-4-13.pdf (206.56 KB, 60 views)

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