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LindaGreesonRice

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This is a special thread for Mastiff health issues - where to go to find out more about the issues and what they are, what testing is available and where to find out about it.

Mastiff Health Testing

 

1 - What is vWd?? (von WilleBrand’s Disease)  http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+1614&aid=488

 vWd ..   http://www.vetgen.com/documents/order-form.canine.feline.pdf

 *****************************************

 2 - What is DM ? ( Degenerative Myelopathy )
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/fullyvetted/2012/june/degenerative_myelopathy_in_dogs

 DM  ..   http://www.caninegeneticdiseases.net/DM/DMsample.pdf

 *****************************************

 3 - What is a “fluffy” mastiff?? http://devinefarm.net/rp/hairies.htm

 Long Hair DNA test (Fluffy gene)  http://www.vetnostic.com/mastiff.html

 *****************************************

 4 - What is CERF??  http://web.vmdb.org/home/CERF.aspx

 CERF - http://web.vmdb.org/home/CERF.aspx

 *****************************************

 5 - What is PRA? http://www.optigen.com/opt9_test_dominant_pra.html

 PRA - http://www.optigen.com/opt9_printform.taf?lang=en

 *****************************************

 6 - What is CMR1 ?? (Canine Multifocal Retinopathy) http://www.optigen.com/opt9_test_cmr.html

 CMR1 ..   http://www.optigen.com/opt9_printform.taf?lang=en

 *****************************************

 7 - What is Cystinuria??  http://www.mastiff.org/CYSTINURIA.htm

 Cystinuria -  Information:  http://www.worldmastiffforum.com/file?id=1343048

 *****************************************

 8 - OFA Thyroid: http://www.offa.org/pdf/thyapp_bw.pdf

OFA Discussion of Thyroid : http://www.offa.org/thy_class.html

 *****************************************

 9 - What are Patellas?? 

http://www.thewholedog.org/artPatella.html

OFA Patella disease discussion :  http://www.offa.org/pl_overview.html

 OFA Patellas :  http://www.offa.org/pdf/plapp_bw.pdf

 *****************************************

 10 - OFA Elbows :  http://www.offa.org/pdf/hdedapp_bw.pdf

OFA Explanation of Elbow Dysplasia: http://www.offa.org/ed_faqs.html

 *****************************************

 11 - OFA Hips:  http://www.offa.org/pdf/hdedapp_bw.pdf

OFA  Explanation of Hip scores: http://www.offa.org/hd_grades.html

 *****************************************

 12 - OFA Cardiac :  http://www.offa.org/pdf/cardapp_bw.pdf

OFA Discussion of Heart Disease: http://www.offa.org/cardiac_about.html

 *****************************************

 13 - What is CHIC ?   http://www.caninehealthinfo.org/

 CHIC  Repository :  http://www.caninehealthinfo.org/chic_dnabankapp_main.pdf

 *****************************************

 14 - AKC DNA Tests - http://classic.akc.org/store/products/index.cfm?category_cde=DNA&product_view=thumb

 


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Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
LindaGreesonRice

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Tests that are good to have done on the sire and dam:
 
HEALTH TESTING that is good to have done
 
1. OFA(Orthopedic Foundation for Animals) Hips
         done at 12 months or older ( permanent number given after 24 months)

 
2. OFA Elbows 
       
done at 12 months or older ( permanent number given after 24 months)

3. OFA Heart - 12 months or older
 
4. Cystinuria  - DNA test, may be done at any age
 
5. Thyroid - 12 months or older
 
6. Patellas - 12 months and older

7. VwD (Von Willenbrand's Disease) - any age

8. PRA(Progressive Retinal Atrophy) DNA test, may be done at any age
 
9. CMR1 - (eyes) DNA test, may be done at any age
 
10. CERF(Canine Eye Registration Foundation) 24 months or older
(can and should do this earlier-at any age, must re-register once
a year)

 11 - Fluffy coat gene (long hair)
DNA test, may be done at any age

 
 


__________________
Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
LindaGreesonRice

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Posts: 7,867
Reply with quote  #3 

Some good news to add!

 

CROSS POSTED WITH PERMISSION

 

I am pleased to announce that OptiGen has officially announced their new
CMR (Canine Multi-focal Retinopathy) DNA test that is now available to
Mastiffs. Most of us are more familiar with the description of Retinal Dysplasia
Focal/Folds.  The cost of this new test is $95 + $7.50 for the OFA
registry. We can get a 5% discount for filling out OptiGen's online submission
form and another 20% off if we participate in a 20/20 satellite clinic.

OptiGen has also announced that for all Mastiffs (from any country) that
have previously been PRA DNA tested with them, we do not need to send in
more blood.  OptiGen can use blood that they have archived from
previously tested Mastiffs regardless if we paid for long-term storage or not.
This will be a huge savings by not having to pay shipping and possible
veterinarian expenses.

CMR in Mastiffs is an autosomal recessive disease, so the gene mutation
is inherited from both the mother & father.  By utilizing OptiGen's new CMR
DNA test and by following their breeding recommendations, we can still use
dogs in our breeding programs regardless of their genetic status.  This will
allow us to eliminate the disease from our gene pool while maintaining
the positive traits that we desire.

OptiGen has posted more information and details on this new test on
their website at:

 

http://www.optigen.com/opt9_test_cmr.html

I would like to thank all of you that sent in blood samples on CMR
affected Mastiffs & made this test possible!!

Anna May
MCOA Health Committee Co-Chair

=====================================

 

 

 


 


__________________
Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
Dixie

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Reply with quote  #4 
it looks like the MCOA recommends getting your dogs thyroid checked at two years, three years and five years of age.
 
I had my females full thyroid panel done a year ago (on her second birthday).  Do you think that MCOA is saying that I need to do another FULL panel thyroid test (third birthday)? 
 
Or is doing a T3 and T4 good enough for the third year?
 
I want that gold health award and I almost have it 
 
I'm getting the CMR test tomorrow..just need to know about that thyroid test.  Thanks for any input!

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Entropions! My 4 month old puppy has entropions in both lower eye lids. The optomologist tacked both lower lids and we are hoping he will grow into his skin. Has anyone had any experience with entropions? Eye tacking?


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LindaGreesonRice

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Canine Coat Length Test - (Fluffy gene)

There is a very simple test that can be done using cheek swabs to determine if a dog is carrying the recessive gene for long hair. The cost is only $58 for this DNA test, and is so simple to do. No blood draws are necessary - just a few cheek swabs are done and mailed in a regular envelope - you get the results back in a few days and receive an official certificate to back up the results. Here is the link:

http://www.vetdnacenter.com/canine-long-hair-test.html

If two dogs carrying the recessive gene are bred together, the results are:

(a carrier simply means that the dogs is carrying the recessive gene - it is not visual)

25% visual fluffys
50% fluffy carriers
25% normal

If only one dog is a carrier, then none of the puppies will be fluffys. You will have a percentage of carriers, but at least no visuals.

__________________
Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
LindaGreesonRice

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Posts: 7,867
Reply with quote  #7 
New Vaccine Protocol

  Summary –

 

8 weeks – DHPP (distemper, hepatitis, parvo, parinfluenze)

12 weeks – DHPP

16 weeks – DHPP

6 months – Rabies

14 months – DHPP Booster –last one ever


Dr. Jean Dodd's protocol is now being adopted by ALL 27 North American
veterinary schools.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vaccination NEWSFLASH
I would like to make you aware that all 27 veterinary schools in
North
America are in the process of changing their protocols for vaccinating dogs and
cats. Some of this information will present an ethical & economic challenge to
vets, and there will be skeptics.
Some organizations have come up with a political compromise suggesting
vaccinations every 3 years to appease those who fear loss of income vs. those
concerned about potential side effects.
Politics, traditions, or the doctor's economic well being should not be a
factor in medical decision.

NEW PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY
"Dogs and cats immune systems mature fully at 6 months. If a modified live
virus vaccine is given after 6 months of age, it produces an immunity which is
good for the life of the pet (ie: canine distemper, parvo, feline
distemper). If another MLV vaccine is given a year later, the antibodies from the first
vaccine neutralize the antigens of the second vaccine and there is little or
no effect. The titer is not "boosted" nor are more memory cells induced."
Not only are annual boosters for parvo and distemper unnecessary, they subject
the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and immune-mediated
hemolytic anemia. "There is no scientific documentation to back up label claims for
annual administration of MLV vaccines." Puppies receive antibodies through
their mothers milk. This natural protection can last 8-14 weeks.
Puppies & kittens should NOT be vaccinated at LESS than 8 weeks. Maternal
immunity will neutralize the vaccine and little protection (0-38%) will be
produced. Vaccination at 6 weeks will, however, delay the timing of the first
highly effective vaccine. Vaccinations given 2 weeks apart suppress rather than
stimulate the immune system. A series of vaccinations is given starting at 8
weeks and given 3-4 weeks apart up to 16 weeks of age. Another vaccination
given sometime after 6 months of age (usually at 1 year 4 mo) will provide
lifetime immunity.

CURRENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DOGS
Distemper & Parvo
"According to Dr. Schultz, AVMA, 8-15-95, when a vaccinations series given
at 2, 3 & 4 months and again at 1 year with a MLV, puppies and kitten program
memory cells that survive for life, providing lifelong immunity." Dr.
Carmichael at Cornell and Dr. Schultz have studies showing immunity against
challenge at 2-10 years for canine distemper & 4 years for parvovirus. Studies for
longer duration are pending. "There are no new strains of parvovirus as one
mfg. would like to suggest. Parvovirus vaccination provides cross immunity for
all types." Hepatitis (Adenovirus) is one of the agents known to be a cause of
kennel cough. Only vaccines with CAV-2 should be used as
CAV-1 vaccines carry the risk of "hepatitis blue-eye" reactions & kidney
damage.
Bordetella Parainfluenza: Commonly called "Kennel cough"
Recommended only for those dogs boarded, groomed, taken to dog shows, or for
any reason housed where exposed to a lot of dogs. The intranasal vaccine
provides more complete and more rapid onset of immunity with less chance of
reaction. Immunity requires 72 hours and does not protect from every cause of
kennel cough. Immunity is of short duration (4 to 6 months).
RABIES
There have been no reported cases of rabid dogs or cats in Harris,
Montogomery or Ft. Bend Counties [Texas], there have been rabid skunks and bats so the
potential exists. It is a killed vaccine and must be given every year.
Lyme disease is a tick born disease which can cause lameness, kidney failure
and heart disease in dogs. Ticks can also transmit the disease to humans.
The original Ft. Dodge killed bacteria has proven to be the most effective
vaccine. Lyme disease prevention should emphasize early removal of ticks. Amitraz
collars are more effective than Top Spot, as amitraz paralyzes the tick's
mouth parts preventing transmission of disease .

VACCINATIONS NOT RECOMMENDED
Multiple components in vaccines compete with each other for the immune
system and result in lesser immunity for each individual disease as well as
increasing the risk of a reaction.
Canine Corona Virus is only a disease of puppies. It is rare, self limiting
(dogs get well in 3 days without treatment). Cornell &Texas A&M have only
diagnosed one case each in the last 7 years. Corona virus does not cause disease
in adult dogs.
Leptospirosis vaccine is a common cause of adverse reactions in dogs . Most
of the clinical cases of lepto reported in dogs in the US are caused by
serovaars (or types) grippotyphosa and bratsilvia.
The vaccines contain different serovaars eanicola and ictohemorrhagica.
Cross protection is not provided and protection is short lived. Lepto vaccine is
immuno-supressive to puppies less than 16 weeks.

NEW RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CATS
Feline vaccine related Fibrosarcoma is a type of terminal cancer related in
inflammation caused by rabies & leukemia vaccines . This cancer is thought to
affect 1 in 10,000 cats vaccinated. Vaccines with aluminum adjuvant, an
ingredient included to stimulate the immune system, have been implicated as a
higher risk. We now recommend a non-adjuvanted rabies vaccine for cats . Testing
by Dr. Macy, Colorado State, has shown this vaccine to have the lowest
tissue reaction and although there is no guarantee that a vaccine induced sarcoma
will not develop, the risk will be much lower than with other vaccines.
Program injectable 6 mo flea prevention for cats has been shown to be very
tissue reactive & therefore has the potential of inducing an injection site
fiborsarcoma. If your cats develops a lump at the site of a vaccination, we
recommend that it be removed ASAP, within 3-12 weeks.
Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine
This virus is the leading viral killer of cats. The individuals most at risk
of infection are young outdoor cats, indoor/outdoor cats and cats exposed to
such individuals. Indoor only cats with no exposure to potentially infected
cats are unlikely to become infected. All cats should be tested prior to
vaccination. Cats over one year of age are naturally immune to Fel.V whether they
are vaccinated or not, so annual vaccination of adult cats is NOT necessary.
The incubation period of Feline leukemia can be over 3 years, so if your cat
is in the incubation state of the disease prior to vaccination, the vaccine
will not prevent the disease. Feline Panleukopenia Virus Vaccine.
Also called feline distemper is a highly contagious and deadly viral disease
of kittens. It's extremely hardy and is resistant to extremes in temperature
and to most available disinfectants.
Although an effective treatment protocol is available, it is expensive to
treat because of the serious nature of the disease and the continued presence
of virus in the environment, vaccination is highly recommended for all kittens
. Cats vaccinated at 6 month or older with either killed or MLV vaccine will
produce an immunity good for life. Adult cats do NOT need this vaccine.
Feline Calicivirus/ Herpesvirus Vaccine.
Responsible for 80-90% of infectious feline upper respiratory tract
diseases. The currently available injectable vaccines will minimize the severity of
upper respiratory infections, although none will prevent disease in all
situations .. Intranasal vaccines are more effective at preventing the disease
entirely. Don't worry about normal sneezing for a couple of days. Because
intranasal vaccines produce an immunity of shorter durations, annual vaccination is
recommended.

VACCINES NOT RECOMMENDED
Chlamydia or pneumonitis.
The vaccine produces on a short (2 month) duration of immunity and accounts
for less than 5% of upper respiratory infections in cats. The risks outweigh
the benefits.
Feline Infectious Peritonitis.
A controversial vaccine. Most kittens that contract FIP become infected
during the first 3 months of life. The vaccine is labeled for use at 16 weeks.
All 27 vet schools do not recommend the vaccine.
Bordetella
A new vaccine for feline bordetella has been introduced. Dr. Wolfe of Texas
A&M says that bordetella is a normal flora and does not cause disease in
adult cats. Dr. Lappin of Colorado State says that a review of the Colorado State
medical records reveals not one case diagnosed in 10 years.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS
Giardia is the most common intestinal parasite of humans in North America,
30% or more of all dogs & cats are infected with giardia. It has now been
demonstrated that humans can transmit giardia to dogs & cats & vice versa.
Heartworm preventative must be given year round in Houston .

VACCINES BADLY NEEDED
New vaccines in development include: Feline Immunodeficiency Virus and cat
scratch fever vaccine for cats and Ehrlichia [one of the other tick diseases,
much worse than Lymes] for dogs.

THE VIEW FROM THE TRENCHES; BUSINESS ASPECTS
Most vets recommend annual boosters and most kennel operators require them.
For years the pricing structure of vets has misled clients into thinking that
the inherent value of an annual office visit was in the "shots" they failed
to emphasize the importance of a physical exam for early detection of
treatable diseases. It is my hope that you will continue to require rabies & Kennel
cough and emphasize the importance of a recent vet exam. I also hope you will
accept the new protocols and honor these pets as currently vaccinated. Those
in the boarding business who will honor the newvaccine protocols can gain
new customers who were turned away from vet owned boarding facilities reluctant
to change.

CONCLUSION
Dogs & cats no longer need to be vaccinated against distemper, parvo, &
feline leukemia every year . Once the initial series of puppy or kitten
vaccinations and first annual vaccinations are completed, immunity from MLV vaccines
persists for life. It has been shown that cats over 1 year of age are immune
to Feline Leukemia whether they have been vaccinated or not. Imagine the money
you will save, not to mention fewer risks from side effects. PCR rabies
vaccine, because it is not adjuvanted, will mean less risk of mediated hemolytic
anemia and allergic reactions are reduced by less frequent use of vaccines as
well as by avoiding unnecessary vaccines such as K-9 Corona virus and
chlamydia for cats, as well as ineffective vaccines such as Leptospirosis and FIP.
Intranasal vaccine for Rhiotracheitis and Calici virus, two upper respiratory
viruses of cats provide more complete protection than injectable vaccines
with less risk of serious reactions.

The AAHA and all 27 veterinary schools of North America are our biggest
endorsement for these new protocols.

Dr. Bob Rogers
Please consider as current on all vaccinations for boarding purposes .

DOGS Initial series of puppy vaccines
1. distemper, hepatitis, parvo, parinfluenze - 3 sets one month apart
concluding at 16 weeks of age.
2. Rabies at 16 weeks of age (later is better)
3. Bordetella within last 4-6 months
First annual (usually at 1 year and 4 months of age)
1. DHP, Parvo, Rabies
2. Bordetella within last 4-6 months
2 years or older
1. Rabies with in last year
2. Bordetella within last 4-6 months
3. DHP & Parvo given anytime over 6 months of age , but not necessarily
within the last year.
Recommended: Physical exam for transmissible diseases and health risks.

CATS Initial kitten series
1. Distemper [PLP], Rhino Calicivirus, Feline Leukemia Vaccine - 3 sets
given one month apart concluding at 16 weeks.
2. Rabies at 16 weeks
First Annual [usually at 1 year and 4 months of age]
1. Distemper (PLP), Rhino Calicivirus, Rabies
2 years or older
1. Rabies within the last year
2. Rhino Calicivirus within last year
3. Distemper and FelV given anytime after 6 months of age, but not
necessarily with the last year.
Recommended: Physical exam, FeLV/FIV testing, fecal exam for giardia.

Meg Affleck
http://www.geocities.com/heikodeufringerschloss



__________________
Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
childrenwithfur

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Reply with quote  #8 

Dog Related Websites and Recommended Resources from A to Z Prepared by Dana Palmer, Extension Associate

Department of Animal Science, Cornell University



http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/4H/dogs/dog_resourcelist07.pdf

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What Wisdom Can You Find That Is Greater Than Kindness?
Cammie
childrenwithfur

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Reply with quote  #9 
How to detect and find treatment for pet cancer

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21366357/

TODAY
updated 9:48 a.m. PT, Fri., Oct. 19, 2007

It's very traumatic when a family member is diagnosed with cancer. You may be surprised to know that often that family member is your dog or cat. Unfortunately, cancer is very common in companion animals, but thanks to advanced veterinary medicine, many of these animals are surviving while continuing to have a wonderful quality of life. Although a cancer diagnosis can be frightening, the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Foundation (the “ACVIM Foundation”) and Tails of Hope Foundation have compiled the following information to help you get the best treatment possible for your beloved family member: 

What are the common signs of cancer in companion animals?
As in human cancer, detection is the first step to recovery. Knowing what to look for could save your companion animal's life. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, common signs of cancer include:

Abnormal swellings that persist or continue to grow

Sores that do not heal

Weight loss

Loss of appetite

Bleeding or discharge from any body opening

Offensive odor

Difficulty eating or swallowing

Hesitation to exercise or loss of stamina

Persistent lameness or stiffness

Difficulty breathing, urinating, or defecating

My companion animal has been diagnosed with cancer. This seems very scary! What does this mean?
Cancer is a very general term that means that a normal tissue in your companion animal's body is no longer behaving in a normal manner, and is growing and developing outside of the body's usual regulation and control. Depending on the type of cancer, your veterinarian may also tell you that your companion animal has a "tumor" or a "mass".  These are very nonspecific terms and do not indicate whether or not the disease is easily treatable. Cancer causes problems in the body by affecting local structures, or by spreading to other organs (metastasis).

Who treats cancer in companion animals?
There are several types of Board-certified Veterinary Specialists who work together to treat cancer. Specialists are veterinarians who, after graduating from veterinary school, seek additional focused training in certain areas. This training usually lasts an additional 3-4 years (one year of internship, and 2-3 years of residency, depending on the specialty). At the end of this training, the Specialist must pass a certifying exam. 

The types of Board-certified Veterinary Specialists who treat cancer are:

Medical oncologists
A veterinary medical oncologist is a veterinarian who specializes in the overall diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and will usually administer chemotherapy. Medical oncologists are Board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM). Their credentials will usually read "Diplomate ACVIM - Oncology". For more information, including a searchable database, please visit http://www.ACVIM.org.

Radiation oncologists
A veterinary radiation oncologist is a veterinarian who specializes in the treatment of cancer with radiation therapy. Radiation oncologists are Board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR). Their credentials will usually read "Diplomate ACVR (RO)".  For more information, including a searchable database, please visit http://www.acvr.org.

Surgeons
A veterinary surgeon is a veterinarian who specializes in surgery. Veterinary surgeons are Board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS). Their credentials will usually read "Diplomate ACVS". Some surgeons have a special interest in surgical oncology, however there is currently no formal certification for surgical oncology as a subfield. For more information, including a searchable database, please visit http://www.acvs.org.

After a cancer diagnosis, your medical oncologist can suggest, based on your companion animal's condition, what the best treatment protocol is, which may include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation, as discussed below.

How do I find appropriate treatment for my companion animal?
Your first resource is your family veterinarian (general practitioner) who knows you and your companion animal well. Your family veterinarian can:

Help obtain the diagnosis; help inform you about the disease; and offer treatment options and/or referral to the appropriate Board-certified Veterinary Specialist.

You are encouraged to obtain a referral to a Board-certified Veterinary Specialist from your family veterinarian whenever possible. This ensures the proper transfer of medical information and is beneficial to the Veterinary Specialist, and will help your companion animal receive the best care possible.

Is cancer treatable?  What kind of treatments can I expect?
Advances in veterinary care have made many cancers treatable and capable of being put into remission, or possibly cured, while preserving the animal's quality of life. Not all cancers are curable, and different types of cancer respond to different treatments in different ways and with different levels of success. There are many different options, depending on the type of cancer, where it is located, and how advanced it is. Some cancers are quite benign and easily treated. Others are locally aggressive but do not tend to spread to other parts of the body. Others are systemically aggressive and spread to other organs.

Depending on your companion animal's condition, diagnostic testing or management may be needed including:

Advanced laboratory testing of various blood or tissue samples

Biopsies and tissue analysis

Diagnostic imaging

Chemotherapy

Radiation therapy

Surgery

Cancer vaccines for certain types of cancer (e.g., melanoma)

A friend of mine was treated for cancer and seemed very tired and sick most of the time. Is it fair to put my companion animal through that?
Dogs and cats seem to tolerate anesthesia, surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy more easily than people. Also there are many different treatment options used for your companion animal with cancer. The goal is always to cure the cancer if possible, but in many veterinary patients, a complete cure may not be possible at the time the disease is diagnosed. In this case, the goal of treatment is to put the cancer into remission and lengthen your companion animal's life while providing a good quality of life. Companion animals' lives are too short to allow them to feel poorly for any length of time before we switch to another treatment protocol. There certainly can be complications associated with surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy, but many are mild and self-limiting, and most companion animals tolerate the process well. The specific things you might expect your companion animal to experience vary with the treatment and any underlying conditions your companion animal might have, and should be discussed in advance with your veterinary oncologist. Don't allow your friend's experience to prevent you from at least learning what your options are, and how your veterinary oncologist thinks your companion animal would respond! You may be surprised at how good your companion animal feels during the treatment.

What is the role of surgery and what should I expect if surgery is recommended for my pet?
Surgery is important for the removal of "gross" or solid/visible disease, and is most useful in the treatment of a single, discrete mass. The goal of cancer surgery is usually to remove not only the visible mass, but a rim of normal tissue around it — this amount varies with the type of cancer. The reason for this is that some tumors will extend microscopic "fingers" of cancer into the normal tissue which cannot be seen with the naked eye. Therefore, the incision that is made to remove the tumor is often larger than you might expect. The successful removal of a tumor may be limited by the presence of nearby anatomic structures that have important function and cannot be damaged. In order to perform surgery the patient must be anesthetized. There are certain risks associated with surgery and anesthesia, therefore it is important to test for and discuss other, unrelated, underlying medical problems that may exist so that the safest protocols may be chosen. The tissue that is removed is submitted for histopathologic analysis, so that important information including the type of tumor, a prediction of its biologic behavior, and the "margins" of the surgical resection (how close the tumor extends to the surgical incision, and therefore the likelihood that any microscopic cells were left behind) are known.

How does chemotherapy work and what should I expect if chemotherapy is recommended for my companion animal?
Chemotherapy is important in treating systemic or metastatic cancer and works best when disease is microscopic. Alone, it is not very useful for treating solid masses or tumors. Most chemotherapeutic agents work by inhibiting cancer cells which divide and reproduce in an uncontrolled manner. However certain other normal cells in the body are also rapidly dividing, which is why some chemotherapy protocols are associated with side effects involving the bone marrow (and infection-fighting cells) or the gastrointestinal tract, for example.

When is radiation therapy indicated, and what should I expect if radiation therapy is recommended for my companion animal?
Radiation therapy is best utilized for treatment of local microscopic disease in a specific area after a discrete mass is removed with incomplete margins (meaning that tumor cells remain in the surrounding tissue).  It is helpful for treating microscopic disease that is left behind because of anatomy limitations, or because the disease was more extensive than could be detected preoperatively. However some tumors can be treated by radiation therapy without surgery, and sometimes "palliative radiation therapy" may be indicated if surgery is not possible. "Palliative radiation" will not cure the disease but it may slow progression or relieve discomfort associated with the cancer. There are many different protocols, which can involve few treatments of a relatively large radiation dose, or many treatments of a much smaller radiation dose. Side effects are possible, but vary according to the protocol recommended, and the area of the body being treated, and should be discussed with your radiation oncologist. It is very important that the patient be positioned exactly the same way when receiving radiation treatments, and that he or she does not move during the treatment, so a very short anesthetic episode is typically necessary for each treatment.

What kinds of payment plans are available for cancer-related care?
We encourage you to discuss the likely cost of treatment for your companion animal upfront with your veterinarian. Many payment options are available for veterinary treatment including veterinary payment plans, veterinary financial aid programs, or assistance programs, including the Sponsor-a-PetSM Program provided by Tails of Hope Foundation.

Special thanks to Michele Steffey, DVM, DACVS; Philip Bergman, DVM, MS, PhD, DACVIM (Oncology); Carolyn Henry, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Oncology); and Sandy Willis, DVM, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine) for preparing this information.

For more information about cancer in companion animals or for more information about the campaign, visit http://www.ACVIMFoundation.org or http://www.tailsofhopefoundation.org


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Reply with quote  #10 

i got a question. my pup is 11 months old yesterday and for the past 3 weeks or so i've noticed that he is growing one heck of a bump on the top of his head. it feels like bone right in the middle rear base of his skull. i know hes doing his awkward growing thing, but he kinda looks likes Pluto ( the big yellow dog) from good morning Micky lol. lately his diet has consisted mainly of whole chicken thighs w the bone ground up and eagle pack holistic large breed. he gets about 4 chicken thighs per serving twice a day w two eggs and shell in his kibble. too much calcium? he kinda looks like a cone head ha ha. i have to pump up his food so he eats. as it's readily over 100 degrees out side and still about 75 - 80 in my house. he just will not eat when its hot, and he needs to grow. ill post a pic latter.


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Reply with quote  #11 
Here are some picks of my unicorn dog.

just noticed it 3 weeks ago or so. it just keeps growing. feels solid like bone with cartilage overlay. his daddy has a huge head so could it be framework?? lol

oh and a couple cute puppy pics for you too. ( hes the one with the shoe lace) : )

thanks for the help!

Danger.

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That is completely normal on a growing puppy. He is going to have a huge head -


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Linda Greeson Rice
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The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
rugbymom

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Murphy's elbows look like he swallowed tennis balls and that is where they landed.  Is that normal?  He is my first Mastiff.  He doesn't limp, wince or appear to be in any pain.  He is 9 months old and weighs 150.  He has all his shots, eats a healthy diet and is doing really well.  He gets a slow, leisurely walk twice a day for 10 minutes at a time.  Both elbows look identical.

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Reply with quote  #14 

Sounds like a hygroma and yes mastiff get them. Leave it alone and it will go away. Its from laying on hard surfaces.


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Robin

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Reply with quote  #15 
Hi Rugbymom ~ 
Sandragon is correct, they are hygromas and our Bailey has (had) them too.  We would try to strategically place bedding and rugs where he would lay down to keep him off the hard surfaces but in the hot weather, there is no keeping him off the cool bluestone flooring.  We finally bought a 'cool bed' for him which he LOVES and that helped stop that problem!
When the hygromas were really bad we also bought a pair of 'dog leggs.'  They're cushioned and wrap around the legs to protect the elbows.  These 'supports' really accelerated the healing and I highly recommend them.
Good luck!
http://www.dogleggs.com/


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I have a French Mastiff who is 5 years old. We have been noticing that our dog for the past year has been incontenent of stool. He has bowel movement no matter where he is, in his bed or while on a walk. We take him for walks and sometimes he starts going to the bathroom and doesnt notice until it's too late. In the mornings sometimes he'll wake up next to his own stool. He's a very stubborn dog and likes to mark his territory. Starting a couple of years ago he started urinating on the couch or in the middle of the room infront of us and lately it has turned into bowel movement. He doesn't have diarrhea he eats fine and only doggie food, he drinks plenty of water, and the local vet said there's nothing wrong with him that he's just trying to make us angry. But it's obvious that he can't control it. Any recommendations other then calling nanny 911?

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Allergy testing

The allergy blood test - best $200 you will ever spend. It is a simple blood test - does not take a specialest to run it. (Save your specialest money) It is called the SPECTRUM LABS FOOD ALLERGY PROGRAM.

The Test is called a "Spot Allergy Report" and is run by the Spectrum group. (Spectrum labs)You vet can call 1-800-553-1391 (veterinarians only)

This tests identifies grasses, weeds, trees, funfi, epidermals, house dusts, FOODS, Indoor, Insects, flea, staph and malassezia (I have no idea what that is).

It gives you negatives, borderlines and positives for literally hundreds of things. The report also gives a very detailed list of the brands of specific foos that you can feed your dog.

I just did one of these on one of my problem dogs and found out he is allergic to Alfalfa, barley, corn, duck, wheat and poultry mix.

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Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
CarFam6

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I have been a fond visitor to this site ever since we got our first Mastiff. He is almost two years old now and his name is Rocky.  He has been the best addition to our family.  I've never been one to post, but Rocky has been tentatively diagnosed with Wobblers disease.  We are very worried and would like any advice or information about this disease.

lornadune

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Hello, I am new to this site and I need urgent help.  I recently rescued a nine year old English Mastiff.  I have only had him for three months, don't have any background on him other than he was mistreated and left alone for days at a time in a cold garage without food.  Over last weekend(thursday) he started knuckling with his back paws.  I didn't think much of it at the time being his age and he has very straight, stiff back legs. On Saturday he started to have a hard time turning around and walking sometimes collapsing on his hind end.  On Sunday when I took him out his back end collapsed and he started dragging his hind legs then just laid down in the snow.  I of course went hollering and running for my husbands help.  I think this freaked my dog out, because he somehow got up on his own and came after me.  My husband thought it was probably adrenline because of my reaction.  He is now in a hospital x-rays reveiled nothing and blood work was "great for a dog his age".  Doctor said this morning that she thinks he is actually walking better but still has diffuculty in standing up from a sitting or laying position. Today he is scheduled for an MRI.  My question is has anybody out there experienced anything like this?  The dogs spirit is wonderful, his mental health great. I need some guidance.  Anybody with any suggestions or info will be greatly appreciated.
 
Thank you!  
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Osteochondritis Dissecans
Veterinary & Aquatic Services Department, Drs. Foster & Smith
Arthritis, Bone and Joint Disease
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Click here for a pdf version of this article.  See related products at DrsFosterSmith.com Pet Supplies
Osteochondritis dissecans
Osteochondritis dissecans, commonly known as OCD, is a disease of the cartilage that can affect various joints in a dog. In any joint in the body, two bones come together and movement is allowed between them. Where the two bones meet an exceptionally smooth area of cartilage covers their surfaces. This acts as a cushion and protects the underlying bone. If anything disrupts this smooth cartilage surface, movement of the joint becomes painful. In a dog with OCD, this cartilage is damaged or grows abnormally. Instead of being attached to the bone it covers, it separates or cracks. A loose flap of cartilage may form, or an entire piece may break loose. These are known as joint mice.

Who gets OCD?

CollieOCD is primarily a problem in large or giant breed dogs. It has been reported in small dogs and cats, though it is not very common. It affects male dogs more frequently than females, most likely due to the males' larger size and increased stress on the joint. It generally occurs when the animal is between 4 and 10 months of age, though it can show up in older dogs. There are several breeds that despite being larger breeds have decreased incidences of the disease including the Doberman Pinscher, Collie, and Siberian Husky.

What are the symptoms of OCD?

OCD may affect the shoulder, elbow, knee or hock, although the shoulder is most commonly affected. The symptoms are lameness in the affected limb. Some dogs have a barely noticeable limp and others are unable to bear any weight on the leg. The lameness tends to worsen after periods of exercise and improves after rest. When it affects the shoulder, a shortened forelimb stride may be noted due to reluctance to flex and extend the shoulder joint. Occasionally, the disease will affect both limbs simultaneously and the dog may be reluctant to move.

How is OCD diagnosed?

Diagnosis is based on history, physical exam, and radiographs (x-rays). On physical exam, we notice joint pain. For instance, most healthy dogs show no resistance when their shoulder joint is fully flexed and extended. However, if they have an OCD lesion in their shoulder, they may resist shoulder manipulation and may even cry out in pain when it is attempted. In addition, this flexion and extension of the shoulder joint may worsen the lameness.

Radiographs of the affected joint are taken to confirm the diagnosis. The dog is often sedated so that full relaxation of the joint can be obtained. Several views of the affected joint and the healthy joint on the other side are taken for comparison. A change of the bone underneath the damaged cartilage is often visible. If the radiographs are not confirmatory but OCD is still suspected, radiographs may be taken again in 2 to 3 weeks.

What causes the formation of OCD?

Trauma to the joint, hereditary factors, rapid growth, hormonal imbalances and nutrition may contribute to the formation of OCD.

The cause of OCD is considered to be multifactorial. It is thought that there are several factors that contribute to the formation of OCD lesions including trauma to the joint, genetics, rapid growth, hormone imbalances, and nutrition.

Trauma, whether chronic or acute, may contribute to the formation of OCD lesions. Injury to the surface cartilage may lead to the separation of the cartilage from the bone or cause a decrease in blood supply that leads to cartilage flap formation.

It appears that there is a genetic link between parents and offspring and the formation of the disease. Certain breeds and genetic lines are much more likely to develop the disease. Careful screening of parents against this disease is recommended during the selection of all breeding animals.

OCD usually occurs during periods of rapid growth. Therefore, it has been suggested that nutrition that creates rapid growth may lead to the increase in incidence of the disease.

How is OCD treated?

There are currently two ways to treat OCD, conservative medical treatment or surgical removal of the lesion. Conservative treatment may be indicated for dogs that have early mild symptoms of OCD or where a specific lesion cannot be identified on radiographs. Conservative treatment consists of strict rest for 4 to 8 weeks. Leash walking is permitted but no running or playing is allowed. Anti-inflammatories and painkillers such as carprofen (Rimadyl) may be indicated. In addition, the use of glucosamine/chondroitin products has been suggested, yet there are no current studies that confirm their beneficial use in this particular disease. Conservative treatment may be difficult in young, active puppies who may still need to undergo surgery, if the symptoms do not improve.

Surgery is indicated in animals that show severe symptoms, in cases where large lesions are identified on radiographs or when conservative treatments fail. The surgery is very straightforward. The affected joint is opened and the offending flap, defect, or joint mouse is removed. The prognosis is generally good when the shoulder joint is affected. With other joints, degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) is more common. When the elbow is affected, the OCD may contribute to the development of other abnormalities in that joint.

How is OCD prevented?

Prevention consists of careful selective breeding that avoids the breeding of animals with a history of OCD. Young large and giant breed dogs should not undergo strenuous activity, particularly jumping activities. Housing on hard concrete surfaces has been linked to increased OCD lesions in pigs and may also contribute to problems in the dog. Providing a good balanced diet that promotes even, sustained growth is also recommended. Talk to your veterinarian about what is best to feed your dog.

Summary

OCD is a cartilage problem that affects young large and giant breed dogs. It is due to several factors including genetics, trauma, rapid growth, and nutrition. Treatment is either conservative including strict rest, or surgical removal of the damaged cartilage. Prevention is aimed at good genetic selection, reduced activity, and careful feeding.


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Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
Bellabear

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Reply with quote  #21 
Hi, We were hoping someone could help us with a question we have about our Mastiff. We've had her for almost 6 months now and she is very healthy, all of her shots are up to date so there isn't reason to take her to the vet until June. Last night she was laying on the couch beside James (her favorite spot) and when she got up there was a giant wet spot that had soaked through the blanket she was on and into the cushion. This has happened once before and there is no smell or anything almost like water. Is this normal or should I get her to a vet? We know it's not urine because she has had an accident once or twice and there is no denying that smell. She has been fixed. I've never had a female dog of this size so we're not sure what to think.
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Has anybody ever heard of reverse sneezing? My mastiff seems to do it  a lot and even though I can help him to stop doing it,  the issue is he's still doing it. I've been a boxer owner my whole life and I know boxers are very allergenic dog's I was wondering if mastiffs are the same way. Also he seems to do it most when he gets excited. I'm not sure if that make's any difference but I'd like to find the issue and help him but I'm not sure to start.

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Reply with quote  #23 
Well as most will notice I'm brand new here...I have a beautiful Red Bull Mastiff he is 9 years old and has over last year developed a fluid filled mass on the left side of his head near the ear; in fact, atop his inner ear on the side of the skull. My vet tested him for cancers via biopsy of the drained fluid. It shows no tumor. The mass was drained from its baseball size to literally gone. Over the past months it has returned it is now softball sized. The mass is fluid filled no tissue, you can drain it with a syringe and squirt cloudy fluid. The mass gives him discomfort NOT pain he has full equilibrium, his attitude is awesome no visable pain just the "can you get this thing out of way" attitude. He has all shots, eats well, I feed Nutro, he has a multi-vitamin and drinks normal water volume.My vet is scratching his head and at $1100.00 a pop he will gladly drain the mass and give me antibiotics argrrrrr... I just want a solution for my happy man...Has anyone out there dealt with this before..?What is the solution ? Thanks, Apollo's Daddy...
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Reply with quote  #24 
Sounds like a sebaceous cyst, and they usually do grow back  Your vet can remove the entire cyst, and must get the capsule, or else it will continue to come back.
Not a regular place for them but it does happen. Most of the time they are along the backs or sides but I have a boy that has one in the arm crease

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ApollosDad

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Reply with quote  #25 
Well the mass cannot be drained it is solid now...They biopsied again and he got lathargic and is losing weight. I opted to begin feeding what ever he would eat other than his dry food. Doctor agreed and says fatten him up. I have fed him eggs lard ham boiled and fried chicken breasts, steak. I need ideas please help me... I need to get high calorie yet not so oily that he gets diarrea. What can I feed him that is nutritious high in fat and protein. I need to pack pounds on him. He was 160lbs down to 90. He has gained the last few days from peanut and butter sandwiches cheese etc.. I have fed pasta... I need help please everyone help me get some info to get his weight up... Thanks Apollo's dad...
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Reply with quote  #26 
Adam, have you considered putting him on a raw diet, or looking into cancer diets? Fattening him up through junk food probably isn't the best way to go about it, and the wrong foods may actually give whatever it is that is causing that tumor to grow just the right combination of nutrients. Sending good thoughts your way.
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Reply with quote  #27 
Well thanks for the attempts at help...I finally have the ability to write about it and say my boy Apollo is gone...He died peacefully in our home with his family and all the love we could give...We will miss him dearly and cannot say enough about how these mastiffs are...they truly fall in love with you they look passionately into your soul. They are truly angels...They will protect you with every ounce of their being and love you unmercifully. The pain in my heart is worse than anything I could explain...I know what love is now...It is Apollo....

I hope everyone gets to experience this love...

Thank you

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Adam Passalacqua
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Reply with quote  #28 
So very sorry for your loss Adam, I am sure I can speak for all Mastiff owners, when I say we feel your pain. Take peace in knowing Apollo felt your love and you were able to share your life with him for 9 wonderful years.
Condolances,

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Reply with quote  #29 

Hello, I am new to this site and have a question about my 4yr old mastiff.  She has a dry nose that we were told looks like a hyperkeratotic area. I was told to use Kerasolv and it is no longer manufactured. Does anyone know of any equivalent to Kerasolv or know how to get a hold of some or a better solution? 


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HI there, I am curious if any other members/owners have ever seen this. Its kind of weird question too..

So the other day I see my Venti is big time aroused (he likes his dinner a lot I guess) and his penis is out to the point where the "bulbous" part is sticking out. What caught my attention was these little, what looked to be bubbles that were all over the bulbous part his stuff....they are a yellowish color and covered with clear mucous. I was somewhat alarmed/grossed out and took him to the vet the next day, but the vet said he had no signs of infection/herpes, etc. He's not licking the area, no bad smells, and he's only 6 months old. Has anyone else see this? I took a great picture of it if anyone wants to examine it. The vet referred me to a fertility vet that may know what the little bumps are, but they wont even look at the picture and want to charge me $100 just to see him. So any help would be great!!! Thanks.
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Reply with quote  #31 
^^^Thank you very much!!!
VentiandMe

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Reply with quote  #32 
Ok thank you so much for doing that. He is seeing the vet specialist tomorrow.

Another question I have and its more of gripe is about my normal Vet....she charged me $50 just to say she didn't really know and even when she saw the pic she didn't know. Then referred me to the specialist if I really wanted to know what it was...Should I say something? Or just leave it be?? I am little frustrated that I can put a picture up here  on the forums and a somewhat complete stranger (a very nice one and mastiff lover though! ) can take the picture to her vet and get a more decisive answer...maybe its time for a new vet. I dunno.

Thanks again all and I will post here what the issue was tomorrow night.


Scot and Venti
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Reply with quote  #33 
Hi I have a 11 month 140 lb, cane corso he has been limping for a little while no whining tho so I checked his paws found nothing but today I see that his elbows ore really big like a little bigger than a golf ball and kinda jelly like. He has a vet appointment on Friday but I feel so bad he gets up like a old dog not a puppy. Antwon have any ideas what I could do for him till vet time? I can put pictures up tomorrow he's sleeping now or I would .

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Porkpie

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Reply with quote  #34 
I have a question that I hope can be answered here. I have a 4yr old EM female, and when she is in heat, she has a very strong, distinct and pungent smell. I wash her 'lady parts' regularly and nothing combats the smell. She only has this odour when she's in heat. The rest of the time she doesn't stink at all. She's just come into heat and I was wondering, is there any way I can minimize the smell? She's getting spayed next month.  
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Reply with quote  #35 
You might try spraying a little vanilla extract on her.. also, although I have never tried it - feeding her chlorphyl tablets may help.
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Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
LindaGreesonRice

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Reply with quote  #36 
[image]
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Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
LindaGreesonRice

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Reply with quote  #37 
for George
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Linda Greeson Rice
AKC Breeder of Merit

The Mastiff Sweet Spot
http://www.bluequaker.com/Mastiffs.htm



We do not breed often, but we do our best to breed top quality mastiffs
with excellent pedigrees to back them up. All breedings are carefully planned to produce
the very best mastiffs, sound in both body and mind, beautiful and strong,
representing the true mastiff standard.

We fully test our dogs. We believe that a person that "just wants a pet" has a right
to own a beautiful, well bred dog that is sound and healthy
every bit as much as someone wanting a "show dog".
Sumosmom

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Reply with quote  #38 
I'm new to this board so I'm hoping I'm posting in the right area, sorry if I'm not.. I'm desperate for answers for my 4 month old Neopolitan puppy. We got him from what we thought was a great breeder, but since the day we have had him he has had health issue after issue.. Worms, ear infections, and Mange. The mange was so bad the vet said it was the worse case he has ever seen. Sumo has been on ivermectin until a couple days ago when we had the worse health scare with him. On Tuesday night we notice he wasn't his normal active self, running around. Wednesday morning he could not hardly use his back legs, they were weak and giving out. We rushed him straight to the vets and they said it could be from the ivermectin so stop it right away. They also notice a front toe was swollen. They said to watch him for 2 days to see if he has improvement and if not on Friday they would do X rays.. Thursday morning both his front paws had a big swollen toe and he was now holding the opposite front foot up like it hurt. So back to the vets we went also his back legs were worse.. They did X-rays which did not show any breaks and blood work.. He also lost 15lbs in 2 days from not eating.. I see on line they have his blood work back and the vet will be calling today.. Has anyone every experienced this . Today his doing better, he can use his back legs like normal and his front feet look much better

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mastiffsforhire

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Reply with quote  #39 
I wish I knew about this forum earlier. I think you may want to look into ways of boosting his immune system. Ivermectim is an insecticide used in cattle and is the same as heartguard.

I suggest ending ivermectim and using antibiotic drops and change to a raw diet. I had a rescue once whom I used this method worked very well. You may want to consider a cane corso over a napoleaton, they are lighter with less health problems. I learned this method from a breeders videos who has Italian Mastiffs. Here is a video on raw diet.



My friend has a Cane Corso who he shows, it is 4 years old and never had one single health issue with it. I have been looking into this breed for a long time. My friend got a pup from this breeder only problem is the breeder will not ship a pup. I live in Florida, but my buddy from college lives in maryland. If you are close to DC the breeder who he recommends sometimes has cane corso puppies in Winter. I have added link.

I also wanted to mention for manage I had a dog many years ago and I used olive oil natural rememdy with honey. It actually worked VERY WELL! let me know how your dog is.
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